Posts Tagged ‘motivating readers’

Motivating Readers: Book Trailers, Book Talks, and Speed Dating. . . a Book

August 31, 2010

This month on Literacy Toolbox, I will share ways parents and educators can motivate children to become readers and writers.  This is especially necessary at the beginning of the school year when teachers are building their classroom communities.

Book Trailers are like movie trailers, but, wait for it, are you ready for this?  Books!  Book trailers are a fantastic way to motivate readers to read books.  YouTube has a lot of book trailers that you can watch with your child to learn more about a book he/she may want to read.  One particular channel I like is RandomBooks.  This channel offers book trailers, author interviews, animated features, and other book-related videos.  It’s a fantastic place to begin if you are looking for ways to motivate your child to read.  Classroom teachers (and even parents), consider having your children make their own book trailers of favorite books!

Book Talks are a less technological version of a Book Trailer.  Book Talks are an opportunity to “talk up” a book.  Of course, you should be familiar with it already (so read it before hand), but talk up funny points or memorable events.  Read just enough to entice the prospective reader.  Leave him/her hanging on the edge of his/her seat. . .

And finally, speed dating?  With a book?  What exactly is this?  Choose five different books for your child.  Consider choosing books from various genres.  Provide your child with one book at a time.  Depending on your child’s age, provide one minute (approximately ages 8 and up) to a minute and a half (approximately ages 5-7) for your child to read a part of the chosen book.  He can pick anywhere within the book to read.  Use a timer to time your child.  After reading each book, provide your child a quick opportunity to jot down a few thoughts about the book (what was liked/disliked, surprised him, made him laugh, provided information he may want to learn more about, etc.).  After all five books have been reviewed, ask your child which one stands out as one he may like to read.

Do you have innovative ways to motivate kids (specifically reluctant readers) to read?  I would love to hear them!

©2010 by Dawn Little for Literacy Toolbox. All Rights Reserved.  All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

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Motivating Readers: More Books About Reading

August 26, 2010

This month on Literacy Toolbox, I will share ways parents and educators can motivate children to become readers and writers.  This is especially necessary at the beginning of the school year when teachers are building their classroom communities.

Last week, I posted Motivating Readers, Again: Books About Reading where I shared several books that could motivate children to want to read.  Sometimes all it takes is one book to engage a child who may be reluctant to read.  It’s now the beginning of the school year for many and the perfect time to entice a new reader.  After a jaunt to the bookstore the other day, here are two more books that explore reading as a topic.

Dog Loves Books by Louise Yates is about a dog who loves books so much he decides to open his own bookstore.  After a few false starts, he finally receives a customer who wants a book.  And Dog, being an avid reader, knows just what to recommend.  This is a short book that demonstrates fairly simply how a reader can lose himself in a book.  A good, quick read to motivate a reader in your life.

In Calvin Can’t Fly: The Story of a Bookworm Birdie by Jennifer Berne, Calvin is a starling who is different from his three brothers, four sisters, and sixty-seven thousand four hundred thirty-two cousins.  Instead of learning to fly like the rest of his family, Calvin prefers to bury himself in books.  So, when the family flies south and encounters a storm, will Calvin come to the rescue with knowledge he’s learned from reading?

Do you have innovative ways to motivate kids (specifically reluctant readers) to read?  I would love to hear them!

©2010 by Dawn Little for Literacy Toolbox. All Rights Reserved.  All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Motivating Readers with Real World Activities

August 19, 2010

This month on Literacy Toolbox, I will share ways parents and educators can motivate children to become readers and writers.  This is especially necessary at the beginning of the school year when teachers are building their classroom communities.

One of my favorite ways to motivate readers is to tie books into the real world.  Think about it.  There are books for just about everything out there.  I love to match books to the activities we do.

This summer we have taken day trips to Monticello, Hershey Park, and The National Building Museum.  After our day trips, my kids usually like to learn more about the places we’ve visited.  That’s a perfect opportunity to find books and read more about what interests them.

Monticello

The former home of Thomas Jefferson is located in Virginia.  My son has had an interest in Presidents since he began learning about coins in kindergarten.  I figured it was time to take him to see the home of a former President.  Monticello actually offers family friendly tours specific to kids ages 6-11, which I highly recommend.  Even my 4 year old enjoyed the tour.

After the tour, we chose a few books about Monticello and Thomas Jefferson to read:

Thomas Jefferson by Cheryl Harness

A Picture Book of Thomas Jefferson by David A. Adler

Monticello (All Aboard America) by Sarah Tieck

Hershey Park

My kids have wanted to travel to Hershey Park for a couple of years.  We finally made it this summer!  Our favorite part was the tour through Chocolate World to see how chocolate is made.  Yum!

Afterwards, my son wanted to learn more about Milton Hershey, so we found this book:

Milton Hershey (Lives and Times) by Jennifer Blizen Gillis

The National Building Museum

Our most recent excursion was to The National Building Museum where we had the opportunity to see Lego® Architecture: Towering Ambition, an awesome exhibit of 15 buildings from around the world made up entirely of legos, by Adam Reed Tucker.  Super cool!  Buildings included 2 World Trade Center, The Empire State Building, The Sears Tower (now the Wilcox Tower), Trump Towers in Chicago and more!   We had never been to this museum before and we enjoyed exploring the architecture of the building as well.  This was a hit with my lego loving boy!

Afterwards, we learned more about structures and legos through these books:

Everyday Structures from A to Z by Bobbie Kalman

The LEGO Book by Daniel Lipkowitz

What are some ways you motivate readers in your life?

©2010 by Dawn Little for Literacy Toolbox. All Rights Reserved.  All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Motivating Readers, Again: Books About Reading

August 17, 2010

This month on Literacy Toolbox, I will share ways parents and educators can motivate children to become readers and writers.  This is especially necessary at the beginning of the school year when teachers are building their classroom communities.

Originally, I posted Motivating Readers and Writers back in May where I shared several books that could motivate children to want to read and write.  Sometimes all it takes is one book to engage a child who may be reluctant to read.  It’s now the beginning of the school year for many and the perfect time to entice a new reader.  Here are a few books that explore reading as a topic.

In Miss Smith’s Incredible Storybook Zack thinks 2nd grade is going to be just as boring as previous years.  Then Miss Smith walks into class with her special storybook.  Miss Smith has a way of making stories come alive.  When the class becomes overrun with storybook characters, what will happen?

Book Fair Day is another great book that demonstrates the power of reading.  In it, Dewey Booker, a real bookworm, is horrified to learn that his class will be the last to visit the Book Fair at school this year.  Will any of the good books remain?  Once he finally arrives, all of his classmates look to Dewey for recommendations.  When he’s done he looks around to notice all the books are gone!  What will he do?

Reading Makes You Feel Good inspires children to delight in the joyful, rewarding experience of reading.

Born to Read is an adorable book to read aloud to children.  Sam is born to be a reader, this he knows.  Sam reads everything and for every reason imaginable.  What does Sam read?  Why does Sam read?

For lessons related to these books, check out Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books.

Do you have innovative ways to motivate kids (specifically reluctant readers) to read?  I would love to hear them!

©2010 by Dawn Little for Literacy Toolbox. All Rights Reserved.  All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Motivating Readers with Musicals

August 10, 2010

This month on Literacy Toolbox, I will share ways parents and educators can motivate children to become readers and writers.  This is especially necessary at the beginning of the school year when teachers are building their classroom communities.

This year, I’ve had the pleasure of taking my kids to see Pigeon Party at the Olney Theatre, based on Mo Willems’ book Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! (and others), Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical at The Kennedy Center, based on Mo Willems’ book, Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale, and How I Became a Pirate at Imagination Stage, based on How I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long.  We had a blast at all three.  I think that had we not been familiar with the stories already, we probably would not have even thought about seeing the musicals.

We have been so lucky that the books we have enjoyed reading have been turned into musicals in our area.  Tying in familiar stories with a “field trip” is one way to motivate young readers.  My children were fascinated by the idea that the books could turn into real people on stage acting them out.  They were even more fascinated with the idea that the musical (at least, How I Became a Pirate) was not exactly like the book.  This led to an interesting discussion about how sometimes the musical is written differently, to give more detail to the story.

If there is a children’s theater in your area, I suggest looking into the schedule and seeing what musicals or plays they are performing.  Chances are, at least one of them is based on a book your child is familiar with.  And what can be more fun (or motivating) than seeing that book come alive in front of their very eyes?

What are some ways you motivate readers in your life?

©2010 by Dawn Little for Literacy Toolbox. All Rights Reserved.  All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Five Ways to Motivate Readers

August 3, 2010

This month on Literacy Toolbox, I will share ways parents and educators can motivate children to become readers and writers.  This is especially necessary at the beginning of the school year when teachers are building their classroom communities.

When children are motivated to read, it shows.  They find pleasure in reading that comes from within.  Here are five ways you can help motivate children to read:

1. Choice

Choice is so important when motivating readers.  If a child doesn’t feel as if his reading choices mean something, then why will he want to read?  Allow a child to choose his own reading material (magazines, graphic novels, books, informational guides, etc.), places to read, or time to read.

2. Read Alouds

Twenty-five years ago in Becoming a Nation of Readers (Anderson, Hiebert, Scott, & Wilkinson, 1985) reading aloud was called “the single most important activity for building the knowledge required for eventual success in reading” (p. 23).  Reading aloud to children (whether our own or our students) provides an opportunity for children to hear what good reading sounds like.  It also allows for adults to entice children with wanting to hear or read more.

3.  Be a Reading Role Model

As adults, it is our responsibility to be a good role model in life for children.  It’s also our responsibility to be a good reading role model for the children in our lives.  That means they need to see us reading.  Children learn to value reading when they see the adults in their lives value reading.

4.  Book Talks

Book talks are advertisements for books.  When a parent or a teacher talks up a book and reads aloud parts of a book, it tempts children to want to read that book.  Read an exciting part, a scary part, any part of the book that makes the child want to pick up that book and read it himself.

5.  Interests

I began this list with choice, which is so important for a child to be motivated to read.  Equally important is allowing children to choose reading materials related to their own interests.  When children feel validated in their choices based on interests, they will want to read more.

What are some ways you motivate readers in your life?

©2010 by Dawn Little for Literacy Toolbox. All Rights Reserved.  All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.